Ferachel Drops®

Linea Ferachel

Ferachel® drops with sodium iron EDTA (Ferrazone)
Drops 50 ml

Ferachel Drops®

Food supplement in tablets based on Sodium Iron EDTA (Ferrazone®) Vitamin C, Folic Acid, Copper, Zinc and Selenium useful in case of anemia and iron deficiency

Iron contributes to the normal formation of red blood cells and hemoglobin and to the normal transport of oxygen in the body. Copper contributes to the normal transport of iron in the body. Vitamin C increases iron absorption. Folate contributes to normal hematopoiesis.

Aqua, Fructose, Sodium Iron EDTA (Ferrazone®), Vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid), Zinc Gluconate, acidity corrector: Citric Acid; L-Selenomethionine, Copper Gluconate, Aroma, Preservatives: Sodium Benzoate, Potassium Sorbate; Folic Acid (Pteroil-Monoglutamic Acid).

Whenever you feel tired and fatigued

In case of iron or folate deficiency or increased need

Preconceptional period, thanks to the presence of folic acid

In case of abundant menstrual flow that may cause an iron deficiency

In women on childbearing age with an increased need for iron, due, for example, to sport activities

For vegans and vegetarians or people who have a low iron diet



Children aged 3 years and adolescents: 1 ml per day as it is or dissolved in a glass of water or other suitable liquid (about 150 ml); Adults: 2 ml per day as it is or dissolved in a glass of water or other suitable liquid (about 150 ml).

Valori medi Daily dose
(1 ml children)
%NRV Daily dose
(2 ml adult)
%NRV
Iron 15mg 107 30mg 214
Vitamin C 75mg 93,75 150mg 187,5
Zinc 6,25mcg 62,5 12,5mg 125
Selenium 41,5mcg 75,45 83mcg 150,9
Copper 0,9mg 90 1,8mg 180
Folic Acid 200mcg 100 400mcg 200

Dietary supplements are not intended as a substitute for a varied, balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle. Keep out of reach of children under three years. Do not exceed the recommended dose.

Keep tightly closed, in a cool and dry place avoiding exposure to heat sources.

Expiration date refers to unopened package properly stored.

Iron contributes to the normal formation of red blood cells and hemoglobin and to the normal transport of oxygen in the body. Copper contributes to the normal transport of iron in the body. Vitamin C increases iron absorption. Folate contributes to normal hematopoiesis.

Aqua, Fructose, Sodium Iron EDTA (Ferrazone®), Vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid), Zinc Gluconate, acidity corrector: Citric Acid; L-Selenomethionine, Copper Gluconate, Aroma, Preservatives: Sodium Benzoate, Potassium Sorbate; Folic Acid (Pteroil-Monoglutamic Acid).

Whenever you feel tired and fatigued

In case of iron or folate deficiency or increased need

Preconceptional period, thanks to the presence of folic acid

In case of abundant menstrual flow that may cause an iron deficiency

In women on childbearing age with an increased need for iron, due, for example, to sport activities

For vegans and vegetarians or people who have a low iron diet



Children aged 3 years and adolescents: 1 ml per day as it is or dissolved in a glass of water or other suitable liquid (about 150 ml); Adults: 2 ml per day as it is or dissolved in a glass of water or other suitable liquid (about 150 ml).

Valori medi Daily dose
(1 ml children)
%NRV Daily dose
(2 ml adult)
%NRV
Iron 15mg 107 30mg 214
Vitamin C 75mg 93,75 150mg 187,5
Zinc 6,25mcg 62,5 12,5mg 125
Selenium 41,5mcg 75,45 83mcg 150,9
Copper 0,9mg 90 1,8mg 180
Folic Acid 200mcg 100 400mcg 200

productwarning

Keep tightly closed, in a cool and dry place avoiding exposure to heat sources.

Expiration date refers to unopened package properly stored.

Made in Italy
Made in Italy
Gluten Free
Gluten Free
Lactose free
Lactose free
Production plant certified ISO 9001:2015
Production plant certified ISO 9001:2015
GMP certified for food supplements
GMP certified for food supplements

Scientific evidences on actives

  • Akzo Nobel Functional Chemicals October 5, 2007. APPLICATION FOR THE APPROVAL OF FERRAZONE® FERRIC SODIUM EDTA AS A SOURCE OF IRON FOR USE IN THE MANUFACTURE OF PARNUTS PRODUCTS, FOOD SUPPLEMENTS AND FORTIFIED FOODS
  • World Health Organization. (2006). Guidelines on food fortification with micronutrients / edited by Lindsay Allen et al.
  • EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS); Scientific Opinion on the use of ferric sodium EDTA as a source of iron added for nutritional purposes to foods for the general population (including food supplements) and to foods for particular nutritional uses. EFSA Journal 2010;8(1):1414. [32 pp.]. doi: 10.2903/j.efsa.2010.1414
  • Evaluations of the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) 2007
  • Marchitto N. et al. A pilot study on secondary anaemia in “frailty” patients treated with the Ferric Sodium EDTA in combination with vitamin C, folic acid, copper gluconate, zinc gluconate and selenomethionine: safety of treatment explored by HRV non-linear analysis as predictive factor of cardiovascular tolerability. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci, 2020 in press.
  • Marchitto N. et al. Role of Ferric Sodium EDTA associated with vitamin C, folic acid, copper gluconate, zinc gluconate and selenomethionine administration in patients with secondary anaemia. Effects on hemoglobin value and cardiovascular risk. Health Sci J. 2019, 13 (5), 682.
  • Marchitto N. et al. Effect of Ferric Sodium EDTA administration, in combination with vitamin C, folic acid, copper gluconate, zinc gluconate and selenomethionine, on cardiovascular risk evaluation: exploration of the HRV frequency domain. Clinical Practice, 2019, 16(5), 1245-1251.
  • Curcio A. et al. Efficacy and Safety of a New Formulation of Ferric Sodium EDTA Associated with Vitamin C, Folic Acid, Copper Gluconate, Zinc Gluconate and Selenomethionine Administration in Patients with Secondary Anaemia. J Blood Lymph. 2018, 8: 224.
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  • Linee guida Ministero della salute reperibili al sito:
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  • Van Thuy P, Berger J, Nakanishi Y, Khan NC, Lynch S, Dixon P. The use of NaFeEDTAfortified fish sauce is an effective tool for controlling iron deficiency in women of childbearing age in rural Vietnam.
  • Xiu X Han MD, Yong Y Sun, Ai G Ma, Fang Yang, Feng Z Zhang, Dian C Jiang, Yong Li. Moderate NaFeEDTA and ferrous sulfate supplementation can improve both hematologic status and oxidative stress in anemic pregnant women.
  • Saaka M. Combined Iron and Zinc Supplementation Improves Haematologic Status of Pregnant Women in Upper West Region of Ghana. Ghana Med J. 2012 Dec; 46(4): 225-233.
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  • Bier-Ulrich A.M. et al. The impact of intensive serial plasmapheresis on iron metabolism and Hb concentration in menstruating women: a prospective randomized placebo-controlled double-blind study.Transfusion 2003; 43:405-401.
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